Review: Enola Holmes

ENOLA HOLMES (2020)

Netflix has finally scored the film franchise it has been longing for with Millie Bobby Brown’s Enola Holmes, a fresh take on the detective genre and a welcome refocusing on the lesser known Holmes.

The the matriarch of the Holmes family (Helena Bonham Carter) goes missing, she leaves behind her daughter Enola (Brown) who is soon joined by Sherlock (Henry Cavill) and Myrcroft (Sam Claflin) before she sets out to find her mother. Along her journey, Enola becomes enveloped in a larger mystery that places her life in danger. From the very beginning, this film is off and running at an energized pace that carried from start to finish by Brown’s expertly executed portrayal of the titular heroine. By shifting the attention to Sherlock’s sister, the foundational books have provided a renewed excitement around the world of Baker Street and an escape from the real world. Enola allows for the stories to tackle societal issues (women’s suffrage, for instance) that previous Holmes stories simply lacked the ability to authentically tackle.

Even with the star power of Henry Cavill as the better known character, as well as the star power of Carter and Claflin, director Harry Bradbeer has crafted a film that allows the strength, conviction, and determination of Enola Holmes to shine. Where other films have undermined their stories of female empowerment by having a man save the day, this film embraces its focus and never loses grip, all the while weaving a worthwhile mystery worthy of the Holmes legacy. Intriguing, humorous, intelligent, eye-catching… these are just a few descriptors that Enola Holmes is deserved of. I can’t wait to see where Brown takes the character next.

Rating: 4/5

Photo from Bustle

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